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20120930
20121008
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access in our economy rather than just offered ownership and to me, that's really what wha* the shared economy is about and this great incubating idea of scooter sharing is wonderfulfinger these are all electric, you can power this up on 18 cents worth of power as compared to what gasoline prices are. it takes, if you want to go around the city at 30 miles an hour, it will be less than half of the power of a toaster. it's equivalent to 850 miles a gallon to be on one of these electric scooters. i think it's safe, obviously we're going train people in the right way to abide but all the traffic regulations that we have, but as i sit in my car on days where i have to wait and 7, watch these scooters go by, it's kind of like where am i and what am i doing and can i contribute even more, so it's exciting to see this happen in san francisco, to see its launch, it's exciting that it's an idea that incubated out of the hub, it's exciting to not only see that it's fun for people to get around, to be more efficient and to kind of stralgts the lanes, but it's exciting to know it contributes so mu
economy here in san francisco and as i do that, i always have to think about what to say that mary hasn't already said about it. and if you look at the real estate economy generally in our nation, and the fact that it is still soft. that we still need more jobs. that there is a recovery, but it's a slow recovery. you can't do that without thinking gee, will i sound like a politician for one or the other major political parties? and so i will steer clear of that and focus instead on san francisco and maybe we're living in a bubble, but it's a pretty wonderful bubble to be living in. the real question is the resurgence of real estate we're seeing now, is that sustained growth? is that just, you know, for the moment? but as i look at it, we're putting in place an awful lot of things that shape what our city looks like in the future, how our city operates, how we interact with our city. as i started to think about that, i thought, you know, the number of major infrastructure projects going on in our immediate region now are probably -- there are probably more dollars and energy going int
economies to fwroe and our dialog in our country is the urban cities that have to create the new jobs for the new economy. i know paris must do so as well, and if we work tokt, we can create those and instigate and innovate our new ideas for the new economy and our mutual obligations on the environment, and then there is something that paris and san francisco hold very dearly and that's an ongoing conversation about our human rights as world leaders, so it's human rights, it's the environment, it's the economy and these are the reasons why we hold our relationship with paris and with all the other great cities of the world in a sister city relationship so dearly, we learn from each other, we send delegations to each other, we welcome each other to the city but in each and every instance, we are always thinking about ideas about how we can help each other and help regions improve, so i am excited to have met with the mayor just a few minutes ago to reaffirm our relationship and we'll sign that in a few moments to document that and to promise each other that we will continue this very
business. >> okay. the resulting economy has resulted in internet base for short term rentals and many of the rentals are illegal and the hotel tax is not collected. should the city legalize some or all of the arrangements and collect a hotel tax and we will begin with you -- i will be glad to repeat the question. >> i honestly don't know how you would enforce a law like that. of course everyone should pay their fair share but i don't know how you could enforce that. i believe we should standardize the inlaw units, maybe sure they're up to code and regulate any new units but as far as taxation i cannot see how you could actually enforce that and collect the taxes on it. >> thank you sir. mr. yee. >> cheryl i just want to make sure -- >> i can repeat it. there is internet base market for short base rentals and they sublease units to visitors and tourists and many are illegal and the city's hotel tax is not collected. should the city legalize these arrangements and collect the hotel tax? >> i traveled to different countries and i go to the internet and they have hotels and these renta
, the broader u.s. economy does move forward? if we can get the u.s. economy out of second gear, we have seen the broader housing market turn and we're beginning to see the foundations of some job-growth. if the economy can pick up more broadly, what that would mean for san francisco, given the foundation that we have set for us today? clearly looking forward we think the physical boundaries of what is downtown will change. the type of space the tenants want will change. we think that this is a very good time for san francisco. we live in an exceptional time. and i'm going to paraphrase ever so slightly, but as jerry speyer would say, don't screw it up. [ laughter ] i feel very fortunate to work in this environment, to work for a great company and most importantly to get to work with all of you everyday. thank you very much. [ applause ] >> thank you, carl. now we're going to move from the talk about the tech explosion to one of our most significant economic generators, which is the hospitality industry and i think we're going to have some breaking news this morning, if i can call it that. an
talks about how we improve the economy and one thing we are trying to change to the gross receipt tax and that is a start but we have to press this and business friendly city and benefit those in business and benefit those in need of job when is we have 8% unemployment here in san francisco. >> thank you sir. ms. gavin. >> i would invest in transportation, in public transportation it would be muni. i think a lot of areas that we need to upgrade muni and put it under ground. i would invest in the ferries. i think being a tourist city and many people commute to the city i think it's one area a lot of jobs would come from is invest in the public transportation. there si pending grant for the train to no where with the project. it's $942 million grant that san francisco may get and it's a lot of money, but that train isn't going to connect to the k, l, or m that see the break downs everyday. i know because i ride it so i would heavily invest in all of the public transportation. dc has a bullet train that goes 100 miles per hour. we can have one too. >> thank you. mr. lasos. >
projects and in fact they were never studied and the nearest size project was 100 units. the economy of scale and between that are incomparable and supervisors just to hold up the two pieces of paper. this is five to nine and this is 100 project. and the housing and yet we don't study the five to nine. we study a 100 unit project. the scale is not close. we should have studied the five to nine units. we didn't. we studied the 100 units, the smallest project and to continue my speech supervisors. with this flawed analysis and lead to one success in the city since the policy's conception in 2006 and i repeat this failed policy has one successful project. thank you supervisors. >> supervisors, mayor lee and the members of the supervisor recognized to replace lost gqnresources for this and continuous and reliable revenue stream and stimulus for depressed local housing industry. the mayor had a big working group of the stakeholders. the group of industry specialists were called upon based on experience and industry sector expertise and builders represented by members of the cou
to be, all those things that economies you as well as our own policies to entice growth. >> that implies to me this kind of hybrid, taking into account what we think will happen but also some direction because i know is that the projections were high in the santa clara county which actually is more auto centric, more spread out; it seems that would be counter intuitive considering senate bill 375. >> when you dig down to santa clara in general, oakland, san francisco san jose are taking on a substantial part of the growth. the region came up with a few scenarios and one is that they were all kind of anti-sprawl; some more center focus in others. most of the growth in santa clara will happen in san jose. also in the process we have been coordinating with the cities of oakland and san jose and a big transportation providers, we knew that the big three cities there is leadership in this process; if we were not okay with what was proposed, we have to make surethat we have a voice. a lot of this in san jose. >> unlike san francisco, in san jose most of the job centers are not within the dow
agree with him and the issue that is largest faces us in san francisco are the economy and there are two parts to that and creating jobs and trying to get an economy going that is sustainable and can take care of the unfunded liabilities that we have that are so large. we have $323 million in unfunded liabilities for our health care, and i agree with him again on the pension issue. we absolutely have to do something about it. what i would imagine what we have to do is examine whether or not we need to find benefits or contributions, maybe we need people to retire at a later age, whether people continue to retire and have the pay at $300,000 rather than 150. >> thank you sir. ms. gavin. >> for me the issue in regards to policy that i think many of us know is malfeasance and corruption at city hall. i think that the back room deals that city hall is doing adversely impacts every person in this room. i don't know if you are aware we have not had a sunshine committee in the past four months, and sunshine gives all the right to redress government and it's our open government that you the
environment, it's the economy and these are the reasons why we hold our relationship with paris and with all the other great cities of the world in a sister city relationship so dearly, we learn from each other, we send delegations to each other, we welcome each other to the city but in each and every instance, we are always thinking about ideas about how we can help each other and help regions improve, so i am excited to have met with the mayor just a few minutes ago to reaffirm our relationship and we'll sign that in a few moments to document that and to promise each other that we will continue this very great relationship and we could not have done it without the involvement of our private citizens, tom horn has led a fantastic group of volunteers on our sister city committee for paris and san francisco, and he's doing a marvelous job and this again reflects how our citizenry helps our city become a better city with these sister city relationships and again i want to thank you and the audience too who are volunteers in our -- i really, really thank you from the bottom of my
of the san francisco economy 80% of our economy is small business along our commercial corridors and most jobs are created by small businesses each year. the city needs to reorient its economic polices towards small businesses and start to remove the red tape and stream-lining the permitting process and other ways to facilitate small businesses to thrive and survive in san francisco. so my no. 1 priority is reorienting our economic polices away from the cronyism, the power elect elite and back to the small businesses. >> i was born and raised in the district. that is not why i think you should vote for me as your supervisor. my entire life was been committed to this district starting when i worked for the mayor where women were trained i know what good social services look like, but i understand that we can't exclude people because they are rich. we can't exclude people because they are middle-class at the expense of making sure we're taking care of one class of people. i worked really hard and there were a lot of people that helped me become the person who i am. sadly, my brother did n
to the economy but one solution is improve the economy so we can improve these people's lives. thank you. >> thank you. >> l the homeless problem it's very, very interesting because you know some cities don't -- i think one of the reasons we do have a problem is because of the wonderful social services that we have here in this city and unfortunately as someone who has sat on several committees it's disheartening that just across the east bay, even if you go to oakland, it changes drastically and i think it's one of the reasons people come to san francisco. do they all live here? absolutely not. and i think we have to get tough with this issue and the housing authority truly needs some restructuring, so that they can do their mandate which is to house people because that's another issue, but there is money missing there, so i think we have to be tough with that and it's like tough love but because we do care and it's going have to be dealt with. thank you. >> thank you. >> yes. well, homelessness has been a major problem for many years, ever since i came to san francisco we've had ho
businesses, as you may know, do promote more -- the ripple effect of bringing more economy back into the neighborhoods. small business actually gives back to the community, more than a big chain does. it provides more jobs. it has the filtering effect. it is very important that small businesses continue. also we were -- i also wear another hat. we were involved in when this gentleman also established his first establishment back over six years ago. we are quite aware of this business. and we know that it's been very good operator, thank you. >> there any other speakers, if you could please line up against the wall. >> good morning, stefano castano. i did a lot of the outreach for the lounge. i want to reiterate a couple things. there is a large void on powell. there used to be six watering holes. what's happened is through the years landlords have rented out to a corporate sector. it would have been very easy for mr. sirhed to sit back and greet the mailman and collect a check. what he did was talked to me and says, look, what am i to do here. we've got walgreens with a flagship
concerns about fiscal policy and housing policy. the so-called sharing economy has resulted in an internet-based market for short term rentals where owners or tenants lease to visitors and tourists. many rentals are currently illegal and the city's hotel tax is not collected. should the city legalize some or all of these rentals and collect the hotel tax? we would like to hear answers from miss breed, miss johnson and mr. resignato. >> i definitely think this is a matter that the city should be looking into to collect that revenue. hotel tax revenue is extremely important especially in the arts. i run the african-american art and culture complex, a 34,000 square foot art space and we receive hotel tax revenue. the money we receive is not necessarily always enough in order to sustain the facility, which is why fundraising for that entity is so important. i think the abuses that we see here with some of these property owners should be definitely explored. but i also think that abuses around places like the filmore center, which is increasing rates for the current residents by 25-40% is just
is that like this gap existed even when we were in flesh times when the economy was doing well and we had money and there was surplus, yet there still was this gap that still existed. and i know i
surpassed the goal and paid jobs and not only helping the economy but i can't tell you how many students said to me in different occasions i got to use what i learned in my math or science class or english class in the job that i got paid for this summer, so it is more that we can expect the curriculum to real world experiences that students understand are going to connect them to what they're going to do in the future i think the more engaging the curriculum becomes and the more we keep the students engaged and i am committing publicly we want the students involved and we want your feedback. >> about what about the simpler things and the resources? because a lot of students -- muni passes and students can't access the schools without getting on the back of the bus and maybe a chance of getting caught by the muni police? or the simple stuff like the libraries? and access to printers? what if there is not access at homes? what about the simpler things for students? >> great idea. you probably notice we're taking notes. i think they're great ideas and again we're going to be tapping
of broader issues around the sharing economy, et cetera, you know, i think what i look forward to seeing legislation and i think this is a really, really hard issue. so i appreciate president chiu taking this on. and i think and i know that you know this, that it's important that we treat folks equitably. so i think it would be important that if we're going to allow, say, tenants to have certain ability to rent out when they are away for vacation, that we treat tenants and owners equitably and don't do something that favors someone because they are a tenant to be able to do something that a property owner can't do. i do see the [stk-eufrpgs/] between keeping units vacant, so that they are permanently hotelized, if that is a word. but i want to make sure that we're treating folks equitably. i also want to make sure that landlords should have some role here. so i know that i have heard is of some property owners who will see their building listed on air b & b, because a tenant is renting it out and they had no idea. and that is something that i think needs to be addressed. by the same tok
the neighborhood bmr program. we need units to enter that program. when the economy is slow and new units aren't being added through the mayor's office of housing something like this is really an interesting approach, particularly in a neighborhood that does not have a lot of -- that has a lack of economic diversity. >> commissioner hillis. >> if i can ask a question of staff. the issue of this -- establishing these units as bmr didn't come up in your report. is this something that came up after? >> we did discuss the rent control thing and try to keep them affordable. i'm going to defer to the city attorney, though. there has to be some sort of nexus if you make that requirement. and i don't think we could find that at the staff level. >> fine. [speaker not understood]. has anybody talked about it? are they open to it, administering additional bmr units? i would imagine they are. has that been discussed at all? it is highly unusual, this kind of approach. >> we haven't had any conversation, staff hasn't. >> did you want to follow-up? >> commissioners, thank you. first, the question of the nex
of economy and jobs no longer exist. given the fact we have reducing industrial parcels, especially the site sfmta is looking at, we will have to look in other jurisdictions. that is less of an issue that we are looking at daly city then the question, what else is there. is this the only part, you know, large acre site. are there others we can look to purchase accept -- you know. are there other parcels that might cost us less. >> sure. let me turn this over to our brokerage, who knows very well the daly city market and san francisco market. >> hi. i'm james worth of colliers, san francisco. i will bring in randy keller. a couple things that came up in the notes. the building you are looking at leasing closed in july 2011, so it's been vacant over a year. the real estate market is in another planet from where it was in july 2011. that property is probably worth twice what they paid for it in the open marketplace, so that needs to be factored into your evaluations. the other thing supervisor campbell mentioned is you are stuck. you are not. you have a right to sublease. let's say you found so
was the foundation of the economy. and >> anything that touched on the possibility of prohibition was greatly and popular. >> the first campaign was a great effort, but not a success. >> the war was not over. less than one decade later, a graphic protests brought new life to the movement. >> women's suffrage, the republican convention in oakland, this time it was the private sector response. 300 marched down the streets of the convention center. women were entitled to be here. >> joining together for another campaign. >> women opened a club in san francisco. it was called the votes for women club. if she could get the shopkeepers to have lunch, she could get them to be heard literature. the lunch room was a tremendous success. >> it was the way that people thought about women willing to fight for a successful campaign. what happened was, the social transformation increase the boundary of what was possible, out word. >> there were parades and rallies, door to door candidacies, reaching every voter in the state. >> the eyes of the nation were on california in 1911, when we all voted. it was the
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)